Join the Campaign

 


Last Name
Email

Rep. Peter McCoy Introduces Legislation to Protect Child Sexual Abuse Victims
Former Prosecutor Advances Moral Obligation of Reporting to Legal Obligation

Thursday, November 17, 2011

Columbia, SC - Fighting to increase safety for victims of child sexual abuse, State Representative Peter McCoy (R, Charleston) has submitted legislation for pre-filing that would require anyone who has been given information of potential child sexual abuse to report to the authorities. Current South Carolina law only requires certain professions, including teachers and medical professionals, to report.


"As a former prosecutor, I know that South Carolina must do all we can to protect our most innocent people," McCoy said. "In light of the tragedies affecting the alleged young victims at Penn State University and The Citadel and numerous new allegations across our state, it is imperative that anyone and everyone given information of child sexual abuse report. My legislation ensures every victim has the moral and legal support of his or her confidants."


If passed, McCoy's amendments to Section 63-7-310 will require that any "person in this State (who) has received information which gives the person reason to believe that a child has been or may be abused or neglected" to report to the Department of Social Services or local law enforcement. The legislation would not change the penalty of failing to report, which currently is a fine of "not more than five hundred dollars or imprison[ment] (of) not more than six months, or both."


McCoy, a former 9th Circuit Assistant Solicitor, said the bill is critical in giving voices to those who may not have the courage to speak for themselves. "Unfortunately, I have had to fight for victims of such abuse as a prosecutor. The pain and fear the victims have, in many cases, is known by others who are simply unfamiliar with what to do. My legislation makes it very clear: if you know, you must report and give a potential victim the strength they need."


#

18 other states currently have Mandatory Child Sexual Abuse Reporting legislation.